PJM: Next Up: Democrats Want Children to Vote

https://pjmedia.com/jchristianadams/next-up-democrats-want-children-to-vote/

Inclusion — or, “enfranchisement” — is not an inherent good for democracy. The quality of voters matters so much that participation must be limited to competent adults.

5 thoughts on “PJM: Next Up: Democrats Want Children to Vote

  1. In fact, competence deserves its own tests. In theory, our democracy might be improved if only property owners could vote, or only taxpayers, or only literate, English-speaking persons, or only married males.

    None of those restrictions has a chance of gaining traction these days, but the democratic mechanism of our republic wouldn’t necessary falter if they did.

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  2. I think it might improve if only women could vote. They are the ones who get more education than males. They are less prone to take rash risks with companies they run. They are also the ones most tasked with running households and raising children.

    With the women now deciding elections and filling up Congress, that might actually get some traction a few decades down the road.

    More to the point, however, is that in our representative from of government, all citizens have a right to have their voices heard. The poor, the illiterate, the renters, the homeless, the jobless and the lame all have a stake in the success of our nation. They all contribute what they can and when they can. And if they can’t, they probably did at some time in their lives.

    Sort of like involuntary euthanasia. Who decides who is worthy enough to live. Or vote?

    Or to put in another way, universal suffrage means that it is in the interests of the elite to make sure that we have a broad based middle class.

    Sort of like insurance that we don’t elect a Chavez or someone.

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    1. RE: “in our representative from of government, all citizens have a right to have their voices heard”

      That’s precisely the assumption I’m challenging. One-citizen-one -vote was never a founding principle of our republic, nor of any other in Western history that I know of.

      But apart from that, you might find this video interesting:

      Liked by 1 person

  3. And I suppose that you have an idea of what a “competent adult” is? Based on, oh, I don’t know, a literacy test and, say, the wherewithal to pay a poll tax?

    Trouble is that others have different ideas. For example, I would say that anyone easily fooled by and with unshakable faith in a known liar and con man is not competent.

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  4. “States may not require additional proof of citizenship on federal forms designed to streamline voter-registration procedures, the Supreme Court ruled Monday.

    The court rejected a requirement passed by Arizona voters in 2004 that potential voters supply proof of eligibility beyond an applicant’s oath on the federal form that he or she is a citizen.

    The court ruled 7 to 2 that the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 trumps Arizona’s Proposition 200.

    The federal law “precludes Arizona from requiring a federal form applicant to submit information beyond that required by the form itself,” Justice Antonin Scalia wrote for the majority.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/supreme-court-says-states-may-not-add-citizenship-proof-for-voting/2013/06/17/734a1aca-d760-11e2-a9f2-42ee3912ae0e_story.html?utm_term=.1336aad62a81

    Now your link says:

    “States like California have since transformed because of sloppy election administration, and a process that deliberately fails to verify citizenship of new voters.”

    That is misleading at best. All states that use the federal form are the same. The registrant signs an oath affirming US citizenship. The key is whether people can be compelled to prove citizenship with documentation that may be missing or irrelevant to most people, like a passport. They can’t for federal elections.

    The author is purposefully highlighting California because of the big lie that millions of non-citizens voted for Clinton.

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