Hee hee,

FOX, Classified Documents found at Biden think tank

Not empty folders either

17 thoughts on “Hee hee,

      1. The press is handling this as breaking news, a legal issue perhaps, but a political win for Republicans.

        How would you handle it?

        I think this should be investigated thoroughly and determine what can be done to prevent this loose handling of classified documents. So far, a special prosecutor has been assigned to investigate and he is a Trump appointee.

        In my opinion, the final arbiter of classification should not be just the president, in office or not.
        It is pretty obvious that our secrets should not be scattered around on the whims of a political employee just because he is the chief executive, or VP for that matter.

        Then we can delve into why Biden did not return those papers after years of requests and begging, subpoena or two and a search warrant. Then hire a special master to pore over the massive amounts of documents and why they were kept in a closet at his his favorite restaurant.

        Seems fair.

        FYI, here is how the NYT covered it so far:

        Liked by 3 people

        1. RE: “In my opinion, the final arbiter of classification should not be just the president, in office or not.”

          Interesting notion, but is it practical?

          Surely, someone in elected office should have an absolute authority to classify/declassify sensitive materials. The public interest would have no representation, otherwise.

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          1. A procedure to declassify is necessary. That does not make an elected political leader the best, or only, choice.

            Whenever a known scofflaw is elected president, that would not bode well for the vetting process for handling highly classified information.

            A better way, in my opinion, is to restrict classified, particularly top secret, SCA etc., to the White House office or residence. Then have a document officer, or several, who would keep them available at other locations as needed. If the president needed something critical at 2AM, in comes the officer with the documents. Kind of a variation on the “football” for nuclear codes.

            Years ago there was a dust up about over-classification being a security risk on its own. So that issue needs to be addressed. But declassifying by whim is just not a good idea in the complex and dangerous world of competing militaries.

            Liked by 3 people

          2. “Surely, someone in elected office should have an absolute authority to classify/declassify sensitive materials. The public interest would have no representation, otherwise.”

            No! Elected office holders may or may not be qualified to know what is sensitive and what is not. Classification should be left to the experts.

            e.g. When I worked in an artillery battalion in Germany, a mess sergeant got called on the carpet by the S2 for letting his grocery list get made public. “Who the hell cares how many potatoes I order?” he complained. “The enemy can tell how many men you are feeding with those potatoes,” was the answer. “And if they know how many men are in your unit, they know how many guns you have… and they will plan accordingly.”

            If sensitive materials are to be declassified, it should be done in conjunction with intelligence professionals, not at the whim of a narcissistic fool who locks himself in the Oval Office with the Russian press and brags “see all the secret things I know” as he gives away intelligence from an Israeli ally that could get agents killed.

            Liked by 3 people

          3. RE: “A procedure to declassify is necessary. That does not make an elected political leader the best, or only, choice.”

            Two points. First, a procedure to declassify already exists. Second, government authorities do not exist on their own, apart from the human beings who possess them. It is impossible for there not to be someone with the top authority from whom all subordinate authorities flow. In our system the top classification authority is the chief executive. I can’t imagine any other way to set things up.

            Second, keep in mind that the security problem has two faces, like a coin. One is the problem of too little security; the other is the problem of too much.

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      1. No excuses, but a concise explanation of the differences between the two incidents.

        https://thehill.com/homenews/administration/3806250-differences-in-the-trump-biden-classified-document-discoveries/

        The easiest difference is the self-reporting of the incident by Biden’s lawyers and the fact they turned everything over the NOEXT DAY, without need for subpoena, negotiation, or raids.

        Biden’s team acted IAW with ethical standards. Trump’s lawyers may end up disbarred over their handling , including lying on an affidavit, IAW with Trump’s standards.

        Liked by 3 people

  1. So Biden has been hiding classified documents in some private closet since 2017? Hang his ass for treason, malfeasance, mishandling of classified information and espionage in addition to perjury as a public official, abusing public office and trust for personal enrichment and plain being a clueless leftist ignoramus. That’s a good start…

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    1. Once Trump gets convicted of fomenting a seditious revolt, we can talk about Biden. Because NONE of your stated claims about Biden are true. Just fodder for the ignorant masses, including yourself, who are clueless blobs. Until then, STFU.

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