16 thoughts on “Now we have “fake support”. 18 million fake comments supporting removal of net neutrality.

  1. Sounds like prosecutable fraud on the part of the service companies the carriers hired.

    It’s a shame as Net Neutrality is a very bad idea, and a foolish intrusion into the marketplace.

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    1. Net Neutrality is a good idea. ISPs are close cousins to utility monopolies and should not be allowed to abuse their power. I do not need Cox throttling my use of Netflix or Sling because they want to sell a competing Cox service.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hey man, if you don’t like it you can always freely switch to one of the many other ISPs we have to choose from. One of my favorite things to do is go down to the ISP store and look at the wide selection available to me and compare which sites they’ll allow me to access.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. How many ISPs do you want? There are 15 in Norfolk, where I live, of which 6 offer residential service.

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          1. I also live in Norfolk and there are only two that I am aware of that offer a wired connection (fastest, most reliable). Of the two, only Cox is available in my neighborhood. My house is not suitable for satellite (again, wouldn’t want it anyway).

            But to answer your question, I want one ISP. One that is transparent and reasonable in its pricing, that isn’t free to choose what I’m allowed to access.

            Liked by 2 people

      2. The solution is more choices, not more control.

        If Internet services were available on a free market basis, without franchises granted by local governments, you would not need to worry about throttling as you could take your business elsewhere.

        Especially now that 5G has arrived and physical cable is no longer necessary.

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      3. RE: “ISPs are close cousins to utility monopolies…”

        So what? Even if we assume ISPs are exactly like utility monopolies we would want them to innovate.

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          1. Your ACLU link describes Net Neutrality as a free speech and surveillance issue. It isn’t, really. Net Neutrality policies were originally proposed when it was discovered that the large ISPs were managing traffic flows on the Net and were considering the implementation of metered access plans.

            Since then, the social media giants have become the primary content censors and (along with the government) surveillance operators. The ISP level has become irrelevant to those concerns. Your commentary on this issue has been overtaken by events.

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          2. Of course, the emphasis of the ACLU is the threat to Freedom of Speech if ISPs can block or slow speech they do not like. That aspect of their potential power is a close cousin to their using that same power to block or slow competing services.

            And, in any case, Net Neutrality has NOTHING to do with blocking or encouraging innovation which was what I responded to.

            Liked by 1 person

          3. RE: “And, in any case, Net Neutrality has NOTHING to do with blocking or encouraging innovation …”

            It has EVERYTHING to do with innovation, because traffic management and metering technologies were just being developed when New Neutrality was propagandized into a political issue. Both technologies had the potential to improve consumer services and expand the menu of pricing options.

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          4. Uh, total nonsense again.

            There is nothing about Net Neutrality that stops an ISP from running their networks efficiently, monitoring usage, setting caps, slowing or surcharging when defined threshholds are reached. So your claim that the advent of Net Neutrality stiffled innovation in traffic management and metering is baloney. It makes no sense and, more to the point, it did not happen.

            Liked by 1 person

          5. RE: “There is nothing about Net Neutrality that stops an ISP from running their networks efficiently, monitoring usage, setting caps, slowing or surcharging when defined threshholds are reached.”

            If you believe that then you are just ignorant.

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