It’s a small study…

https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/493931-largest-analysis-of-hydroxychloroquine-use-finds-no-benefit-increased

…and not yet peer reviewed. But the results are enough to consider if you REALLY want to try hydroxychloroquine if you get the virus. And the Brazilian trials were stopped due to highly detrimental side effects. Like irregular heartbeats.

10 thoughts on “It’s a small study…

  1. A Dr. Brown in Richmond came down with COVID. Luckily, he had a colleague who recalled research into lung problems and inflammation 20 years ago. As the patient was slipping into ventilator status he was given Actemra.

    Actemra, tocilizumab, a cytokines reducer for interleukin-6, was given at the critical time to prevent mass inflammation of the lungs. Relief came in less than 2 hours. The patient was fine and went back to work a week later.

    This seems pretty promising. A problem is that it costs $3000-5000 per dose.

    https://www.richmond.com/special-report/coronavirus/a-richmond-doctor-s-dramatic-story-of-covid-19-infection-hospitalization-and-survival/article_750722ad-7918-544d-bc4d-798d456033f6.html

    Liked by 3 people

      1. Of course the cost is high. The question is who is paying. Millions lost health insurance, millions more never had it. Plus copays might be depending on the tier.

        And there might be pandemic exclusions.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. The cost is not that big an obstacle. If it proves to be THE SOLUTION, the rights to manufacture can be purchased from the maker at a fair price and placed in the public domain so other companies can make it in competition.

          Liked by 1 person

  2. I really do wish we could get access to ongoing studies.

    Covid 19 has a stage in which the virus is multiplying rapidly, followed by a stage in which the immune system has kicked in and the virus is in decline but the danger of a cytokine storm and runaway inflammation has taken hold.

    The problem with most of these studies is that the drugs are not given until that second stage has been reached.

    If HCQ, remdesivir, or convalescent plasma are to be beneficial, it will be if they are given in the first stage. Once the second stage has been reached, the virus is no longer the problem and Interlukin-6 inhibitors are the drugs most likely to do good. There is also anecdotal evidence that massive does of vitamin C helps in the late stages.

    If you waited until regular flu patients were at death’s door to give them Tamiflu, it would appear useless as well.

    What I want to see are studies in which HCQ, remdesivir, and convalescent plasma are given as soon as the daignosis is made, like we do with Tamiflu. IF HCQ is to be beneficial, it will be by preventing a cytokine storm, not treating one.

    There are lots of studies going on, there must be some that involve using the drugs at the right time.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. There are studies, but we have not gone more than a few weeks since the HCQ hysteria took place.

    I think what we are doing is throwing pills on the wall and seeing what sticks. Probably not a good way to determine an effective treatment that we can rely on.

    I know time is important, but doing dances and scattering newt eyes is not helpful either. The Brazilian study on 400 patients was not encouraging.

    Any study that has placebos will have patients who do well on both.

    Perhaps these states, like Georgia, that are opening this week will have a hidden benefit. A lot more patients, ostensibly younger and healthier, who can participate without risking their lives.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The Brazil study that was stopped used a dosage 4 times the does used for Lupus and RA, and caused arrhythmias at that dosage, the study of the high dose was stopped, but the patients were continued at the lower, normal dose.

      But that’s a common problem among these small studies, the patient selection is usually people at death’s door and a ‘Hail Mary’ dose is tried.

      It doesn’t really tell us anything when the drug is tried at the wrong stage of the disease and only on those patients who have the worst disease, already fully developed.

      Remember that the standard of care for regular flu, Tamiflu, would have been found ineffective had it been tested in the same way.

      Like

      1. Well, there are other studies going on.

        Even on a fast track system, it is important to make sure we don’t kill those who might have survived otherwise.

        I just hope that if there is a new wave in the fall that we will have some reliable regimens by then.

        I have not heard anymore about vaccines, but I assume the race is on here and abroad.

        Liked by 1 person

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