FPM: “You Can’t Get Hand Sanitizer Because of Government Regulations”

https://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/2020/03/you-cant-get-hand-sanitizer-because-government-daniel-greenfield/

Daniel Greenfield explains, in detail, “America isn’t facing a hand sanitizer shortage because of capitalism, but because of socialism.”

You can make your own hand sanitizer, of course, as the American pioneers or ancient Romans did.

11 thoughts on “FPM: “You Can’t Get Hand Sanitizer Because of Government Regulations”

    1. Oh, and Frontpage Magazine is a complete piece of shit source of anything remotely accurate or useful…

      Not surprised, again.

      Like

    2. RE: “Lister came long after Rome”

      Doesn’t matter. The Roman physician Galen is famous for medicinal recipes, some of them having disinfectant properties.

      Like

  1. Rumor and fear mongering about the FDA, prison labor and everything else is really damn near criminal.

    The FDA rules were simply to prevent bogus, ineffective sanitizers loaded with useless stuff. And at best even the most effective sanitizer is not as effective as hand washing.

    More to the point is the total BS about cheap prison labor at 16 cents an hour making it hugely profitable for the state.

    In a word that is a totally ignorant statement.

    Yes, the prisoners don’t get a big paycheck. But it costs $69,000 per year in NY to keep a man in prison. One of the highest in the country. That was 5 years ago.

    https://www.vera.org/publications/price-of-prisons-2015-state-spending-trends/price-of-prisons-2015-state-spending-trends/price-of-prisons-2015-state-spending-trends-prison-spending

    That is around $34.50 per hour. That is hardly 16 cents. That is probably triple what a private company pays its labor. Or about 5 times the minimum wage.

    Lying about the cost of prison labor and why the FDA needs to have such me handle on products marketed as effective bacteriological products is really the gist of that long screed.

    Hardly helpful information in these tough times.

    IMHO

    Liked by 2 people

    1. RE: “The FDA rules were simply to prevent bogus, ineffective sanitizers loaded with useless stuff.”

      So what? The point is, they could be and had to be removed to deal with a real need.

      RE: “And at best even the most effective sanitizer is not as effective as hand washing.”

      That’s true (I had to look it up), but with caveats. When both options are available, hand washing is preferable. Sanitizers are less effective, but they are vastly more effective than nothing.

      RE: “More to the point is the total BS about cheap prison labor at 16 cents an hour making it hugely profitable for the state.”

      Greenfield identifies wages as the source of profits, because it makes sense. Comparing prison wages to industry wages is the most apples-to-apples comparison you can make. This is because many wage earners live in two-income households.

      Also, while I don’t care to look it up, I’d guess the cost per square foot of manufacturing space for a high-tech, FDA approved disinfectant factory is at least equal to the cost per square foot of manufacturing space in a prison factory that mixes water and alcohol to produce a 70% solution. And probably much higher. Thus again, the rationale for the wage-only comparison.

      RE: “Hardly helpful information in these tough times.”

      Certainly not for people who believe that socialism is viable.

      Like

      1. Let’s compare wages to wages. A worker earns say $15/ hour. $30k/year. Out of that he is expected to pay for food, shelter, healthcare, education and clothing. Whatever is leftover, which is not much probably, is his discretionary income for savings and recreation.

        The cost of the building he works in is above that and is a fixed cost that depreciates.

        A prisoner gets 16 cents, plus food, plus shelter, plus healthcare, plus education, and plus clothing. So let’s factor that in as part of his wage.

        The cost of the building he works in is also paid for, but the extra security would probably be like the security at a plant plus amenities, parking, etc.

        That is more apples to apples than $15/hr v. $0.16/hr.

        As an aside, truth be known, the 16 cents per hour might be all a paycheck to paycheck $15/hr workers ends up with. But that’s another topic.

        About the FDA rules.

        “… had to be removed to deal with a real need.”. Think about this please. If a product is bogus but touts as a sanitizer, that would give people a false sense of security. Would you favor giving police guns with blanks for ammo but tell them it is real ammunition. Or a taser with a phony battery?
        Of course not. Why let a company advertise protection from infection with a bogus product.

        Such would undermine public safety and make things worse. In other words, the bad products did not, as you wrote, “deal with a real need”. Better to not allow useless products and let people exercise greater caution.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. RE: “That is more apples to apples than $15/hr v. $0.16/hr.”

        I’m not convinced. I already said I assume the square-foot cost of factory space in a prison is equal to or less than the cost of commercial factory space. I chose not to look it up, but if you don’t look it up either, you are just making unsupported assumptions, too. In any case, none of the details you mention show that low prison wages are not the source of New York’s potential profit in making disinfectant in prisons, or that the simple wage comparison is erroneous.

        RE: “Of course not. Why let a company advertise protection from infection with a bogus product?”

        Not the issue. The issue is: Why prevent a company from selling a product that works? It is because the FDA rules had this perverse effect that the problem Greenfield points out arose.

        Like

        1. “Why prevent a company from selling a product that works?” Could it be that they were preventing a product that DOESN’T work form being on the market and giving people a false sense of security?

          Len said it, but apparently that doesn’t matter to you. So I said it again. Tt won’t make any difference, but I get my point across.

          Shalom.

          Like

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