Can 22 studies ALL be wrong?

https://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/healthcare/484301-22-studies-agree-medicare-for-all-saves-money

Even the study by the Mercatus Center says there is an overall savings in an M4A program. “Even the Mercatus Center, a right-wing think tank, recently found about $2 trillion in net savings over 10 years from a single-payer Medicare for All system. Most importantly, everyone in America would have high-quality health care coverage.” Interesting.

I’m not sure if M4A is the right path forward. I tend to lean towards a public option that could potentially lead to a single-payer system. But this opinion piece raises some interesting questions.

Full disclosure: TRICARE, which is where I have my health coverage, IS a single-payer system, as is VA coverage if I choose to switch.

4 thoughts on “Can 22 studies ALL be wrong?

  1. RE: “Can 22 studies ALL be wrong?”

    In a word, yes. That is to say truth and reality are not functions of the number of people who share a point of view about them.

    Consider, for example, the abstract from the Mercatus Center paper:

    “The leading current bill to establish single-payer health insurance, the Medicare for All Act (M4A), would, under conservative estimates, increase federal budget commitments by approximately $32.6 trillion during its first 10 years of full implementation (2022–2031), assuming enactment in 2018. This projected increase in federal healthcare commitments would equal approximately 10.7 percent of GDP in 2022, rising to nearly 12.7 percent of GDP in 2031 and further thereafter. Doubling all currently projected federal individual and corporate income tax collections would be insufficient to finance the added federal costs of the plan. It is likely that the actual cost of M4A would be substantially greater than these estimates, which assume significant administrative and drug cost savings under the plan, and also assume that healthcare providers operating under M4A will be reimbursed at rates more than 40 percent lower than those currently paid by private health insurance.”

    The old joke applies. After hearing an impassioned sales pitch, a customer asked the salesman, “How is it possible for you sell your products for less than you paid for them?” “Easy,” the salesman replied, without skipping a beat, “We do a volume business.”

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    1. I know. You don’t like or approve of ANY insurance. That stand alone causes me to question anything you say on the matter. ANY study that doesn’t fully back your ideas is not worth the paper it is printed on. You will find whatever you need to feed your narrative without due consideration of facts.

      Bottom line is, more people are saying it is not a way to bankrupt the economy, but a way to protect individuals and their ability to receive quality health care without going bankrupt individually.

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      1. RE: “You will find whatever you need to feed your narrative without due consideration of facts.”

        Did you read the abstract from the Mercatus Center paper? It tells a different story than the one The Hill tells about it.

        Like

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