33 thoughts on “Trumpism IS Dangerous For Your Health.

  1. RE: “But, the partisan differences towards masks, social distancing and vaccination provide a causal explanation for this correlation.”

    So what? The explanation is probably wrong.

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  2. Considering that in NY and Va (at least) COVID patients were dumped in nursing homes, thereby increasing the death count for the older folks in there, this isn’t surprising. Older folks tend to vote Republican. There is nothing indicating whether someone died because of COVID or had COVID/tested positive at the time of death.

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  3. And of course there are no other variables

    After all. there is no difference between working in a factory or warehouse and working in an office or cubicle.

    No difference between elderly and youth.

    It is turning out that vaccine resistance is remarkably widespread through the population. I can’t explain it, but it is a lot more complicated than political affiliation.

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    1. “…political affiliation…”

      Yes, there are pockets among minorities that are hesitant for a variety of reasons. But surveys by party show a much stronger resistance among Republicans.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. If the survey is by party then yes it is going to show resistance that way. If you did it by race and the reasons it maybe different.

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        1. True, reasons are different by ethnicity in many cases. Suspicion of government is probably one.

          But that is not unlike political reasoning among conservatives.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Considering it is clear that the D party has no idea what folks are thinking, given the results and patterns from the election, I’d not assume anything.

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          2. Democrats have historically represented a broad spectrum of Americans. Will Rogers said something to the effect that he was not a member of an organized political party, he was a Democrat. And that was a century ago.

            Republicans started their lockstep approach of “if you’re not with us, you’re against us” with Gingrich making midnight C-Span videos on the House floor.

            Yes, Democrats bemoan “the Squad”, but we don’t call them traitors or censure them because they balk at party policies.

            Yet, look at the response of the GOP when one strays from the orthodoxy of the current party.

            Liked by 1 person

          3. Historically but not any more. They’re the party of the rich, whereas the blue collars go to R’s. Look at the western part of the state. You’re stuck in time.

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          4. Bernie was after the same constituency as Trump and for many similar reasons. Unfortunately, Clinton got the nod. That, plus “deplorable” gaffe and the last minute rehash of the email fiasco among other factors, sealed the squeaker win by Republicans.

            As far as the party of the rich, don’t kid yourself. The movers and shakers on the right are all very wealthy families, per most of backroom politicking on both sides today.

            An aside on this subject is that Clinton wanted to help coal miners transition to better jobs as coal had been declining for decades. Trump promised to revitalize coal which was a pie in the sky offer to desperate workers. Campaign gaffe by Dems killed that to.

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          1. Not among the R’s in at least one city I know that is predominately Republican. Age has everything to do with it.

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          2. “Of Americans surveyed from Sept. 13-22, 72% of adults 18 and older had been vaccinated, including 71% of white Americans, 70% of Black Americans, and 73% of Hispanics. Contrast these converging figures with disparities based on politics: 90% of Democrats had been vaccinated, compared with 68% of Independents and just 58% of Republicans.

            A Gallup survey released on Sept. 29 confirmed the KFF findings. As of mid-September, 75% of adult Americans have been vaccinated, including 73% of non-Hispanic white adults and 78% of non-whites. Along party lines, however, the breakdown was 92% of Democrats, 68% of Independents, and 56% of Republicans.”

            https://www.brookings.edu/blog/fixgov/2021/10/01/for-covid-19-vaccinations-party-affiliation-matters-more-than-race-and-ethnicity/

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          3. Does that explain how older folks who are normally Republican, are the majority vaccinated, but the minorities are not? In nursing homes, many are minority.

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    2. Yes, there is vaccine resistance everywhere. That is not inconsistent with the proven fact that it is GREATER among Republicans. Period.

      If you believe in science then you know that not getting available effective vaccines for a deadly disease increases your risk of dying of that disease. And you once referred to people refusing to mask up as “sociopaths.” So one wonders, why are you pushing back on what is pretty obvious. There IS a measurable correlation between Trump voting and death and partisan differences in resistance to masking, social distancing and vaccination is the cause.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes there is. Older = Republican. Older people are more vaccinated. “deadly disease” – only among folks over 75 https://data.cdc.gov/widgets/nr4s-juj3?mobile_redirect=true. There is a little bit less of an issue for those 65-74 than those above. “You” wasn’t me. I disagree based on science that masks really do what they are portrayed to do. You don’t have Trump voting stats, only in general. PhDs are mostly leftist, college professors, yet they’re the most likely to say no: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/americans-with-phds-are-most-reluctant-to-get-vaccinated-against-covid/ar-AANjRHh. So there is an official study that goes against what you’re looking at.

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      2. RE: “If you believe in science then you know that not getting available effective vaccines for a deadly disease increases your risk of dying of that disease.”

        It also increases your risk of dying of vaccine side effects. So what?

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        1. So what?

          Once again your argument is both unscientific and – with all due respect – kind of dumb.

          The possible risk of dying from vaccine side effects is miniscule compared to the known risk of contracting Covid. Therefore it is TRUE that “not getting available effective vaccines for a deadly disease increases your risk of dying of that disease.” By choosing to refuse the vaccine you avoid a small risk but incur a MUCH larger risk. Why would any sensible person dispute the undeniable truth of that? Again the answer is obvious – they wouldn’t.

          Liked by 1 person

      3. Refusal to mask back when Northam was doing all he could to delay vaccinating the vulnerable like elders who were not among his chosen communities was selfish as those vulnerable people could not protect themselves. Now that all who want the vaccine can get it there is no valid reason to restrict the freedom of others to protect them.

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        1. “chosen communities”
          You ALWAYS bring the racial grievances you nourish in. That baloney is ancient history but there you go again.

          Here and now, if the tiny inconvenience of wearing a mask in crowds and indoor spaces MIGHT protect some of those silly chosen-to-be-unvaccinated people or those who cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons, then that is a valid reason to wear one. IMHO. People in blue areas are more likely to share this opinion than those in red. Which brings us back to the same place – Trumpism is bad for health.

          Liked by 1 person

  4. “silly chosen-to-be-unvaccinated people” Your credibility for anything just went out the door. Someone who doesn’t respect others choices, when they disagree, are not worthy to be respected themselves. I respect, actually took up for, a lady who was wearing gloves and mask out in the election time frame when someone got mad at her for it. I supported her choice, though I did not choose it for myself.

    So no, if you can’t manage that, don’t expect to get respected for your opinions back.

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    1. “Silly was a very kind word for people who are killing their fellow citizens in thousands. Refusing the vaccine is not merely a personal matter. Respect has to be earned. Being too cowardly to take the small risk of vaccination to protect yourself AND everybody around you does not deserve it. IMHO.

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      1. Being intelligent enough to read medical papers and science, the insults mean that you lack a science background enough that you resort to name calling, ad hominem and bully attacks, because the science isn’t on your side.

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        1. You are not making any sense. That seems to happen a lot. Who am I “bullying” by expressing my opinion about what is “silly?”

          I have enough “science background” to know that there is no actual science that finds that otherwise healthy people should refuse to be vaccinated. There is PLENTY of science that says they should be vaccinated in order to protect themselves and to protect others.

          Liked by 2 people

          1. Saying silly is your choice to denigrate. I didn’t use that word at all for someone who chose a different path from me. I spoke up to the registrar of that city/county because the attack had no place, much as yours doesn’t.

            What pubmed articles are we referring to?

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        1. Interesting numbers here from 2019 (this give a pre-pandemic look).

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_cities_by_crime_rate

          Yes, the larger cities in some Deep South states have some of the highest murder rates. But some other cities in Blue states are lower. NYC had one of the lowest in the country, #20 out of 100, lowest to highest. CA has a slew of cities well over 200,000 pop. That are also quite low.

          Is it coincidental that large cites in Red states are more crime ridden than large cities in Blue ones. Maybe. Poverty is a big bellwether for crime. The poorer states have both. Add in the worse stats for wages, education, healthcare, divorce and domestic violence.

          Crime increased in 2020, Trump’s reign, and will probably show another bump in 2021, Biden’s term.

          Liked by 2 people

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