9 thoughts on “Two more reasons to scrub death penalty.

  1. Sounds like a case for serious prosecution of prosecutorial misconduct.

    Prosecutors who knowingly use false testimony or withhold evidence from the defense should face prison terms equal to that for which the defendant is in peril.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Nothing unusual, just our very flawed system of justice. Better than Third World perhaps, but we pack the prisons with folks who shouldn’t be there, such as the mentally ill and innocents.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Everybody in prison is innocent, just ask them.

        I am sure there are some innocents in prison but prison is hardly “packed” with them.

        As far as the mentally ill goes, it’s getting to be nowadays, if you ask the APA, that everyone has mental illness. I’m not buying it but if you do then, yes, everyone in prison is innocent and crime is a figment of our imagination.

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        1. Studies cited by the Innocence Project estimate that between 2.3% and 5% of all prisoners in the U.S. are innocent.[5] However, a more recent study looking at convictions in the state of Virginia during the 1970s and 1980s and matching them to later DNA analysis estimates a rate of wrongful conviction at 11.6%.[6]
          A 2014 study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences made a conservative estimate that 4.1% of inmates awaiting execution on death row in the United States are innocent, and that at least 340 innocent people may have been executed since 1973.”

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miscarriage_of_justice

          That adds up to a lot of prisoners.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Not buying it. Besides, these “estimates” don’t say if the person is actually innocent or “innocent” due to percieved procedural error.

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          2. The Innocence Project has been taking cases for decades. I get the impression they might have a better grasp of reality than many.

            “A liberal is a conservative who has been arrested”. That phrase has an “anti-corollary”: “a conservative is a liberal who has been mugged”.

            Both apocryphal phrases define in a simplistic way the flawed judicial system we have.

            Liked by 1 person

          3. …”percieved procedural error.”

            Procedural errors should be corrected. Prosecutorial misconduct (as Don mentioned in his reply) should be prosecuted and convictions overturned.

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  2. RE: “Why we still have a death penalty is a question we should really deal with.”

    OK. In my view rhere are people who deserve to be put to death and there are circumstances where putting people to death makes sense.

    I’d say the only valid reason to oppose the death penalty is the effect that arriving at the judgement and carrying out the sentence has on those who participate in the process.

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    1. “I’d say the only valid reason to oppose the death penalty is the effect that arriving at the judgement and carrying out the sentence has on those who participate in the process.”

      Innocence and prosecutorial misconduct be damned, Todd?

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