The Big Winner of Biden’s Green Energy Plan is His Energy Secretary’s Old Company

Source: FrontPage Mag.

Stumble Joe wants the federal government to install 500,000 electric vehicle charging stations costing as much as $260,000 each. Putting cost and environmental issues aside, it is a dubious boondoggle.

To begin with, private industry has already installed almost 100,000 charging stations, according to the web site statista.com. As technology and methods improve, private industry can certainly continue the installations, and will do so more efficiently than any federal program.

Equally concerning is the question of equity. Currently, EVs are disproportionately owned by high-income earners, such that the benefits of the charging station program will flow disproportionately to one segment of society at the expense of another.

Put another way, EV charging stations do not meet the definition of a public good because they are rivalrous, meaning some people will enjoy the benefit while others will not.

Finally, the are signs of conflict of interest and crony capitalism in the program itself, as the FPM article details.

Bottom line: Why should government do what private industry can do on its own?

9 thoughts on “The Big Winner of Biden’s Green Energy Plan is His Energy Secretary’s Old Company

  1. Guess you haven’t been paying attention to the new GM marketing of an EV for everyone.

    But, hey your anti-Biden rhetoric causes me to say only one thing.

    So what?

    OK two.

    Nothing to see here.

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    1. RE: “Guess you haven’t been paying attention to the new GM marketing of an EV for everyone.”

      Yes, I have. Stumble Joe’s extravagance will be like a financial subsidy to GM. That alone makes the program a boondoggle.

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      1. Supporting the evolution in the automotive industry is now a “boondoggle”? If this had been a T**** policy you would have cheered it from your rooftop.

        IS GM developing and installing the charging stations? Uh, no. The private sector, with government support, is doing so. Fossil fuel subsidies are still out there, while those companies rake in profits in the 8-10 BILLION dollar range QUARTERLY.

        Screw your boondoggle assertion. It is the usual fertilizer.

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        1. RE: “Supporting the evolution in the automotive industry is now a ‘boondoggle’?”

          Yes, for the reasons given.

          Like

  2. “Bottom line: Why should government do what private industry can do on its own?”

    If you believe we need to start transitioning away from fossil fuels, (and this administration seems to at least be leaning that direction) the government will have to subsidize recharging stations in areas of the country not deemed profitable by the private companies. As you correctly point out, EVs are a rich guy thing at the moment, so if we want everyone to have one, that will require federal subsidy of both charging stations and the vehicles themselves.

    And/or the feds should get off their butts and start laying a few hundred thousand miles of rail.

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    1. RE: “If you believe we need to start transitioning away from fossil fuels… the government will have to subsidize recharging stations in areas of the country not deemed profitable by the private companies.”

      We are already transitioning away from fossil fuels, as the Texas blackout amply demonstrated. Locally, Norfolk, Virginia Beach and Chesapeake have more than 130 public EV charging stations (with Chesapeake having the most) — all funded without Biden’s program. There is no “problem” to be solved.

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      1. We’re not transitioning quickly enough to avert the more catastrophic climate change predictions. Hampton Roads is a major MSA–you have to think about rural areas where driving distances are greater, or people who just like SUVs and pickups. We can’t consume our way out of this; the government is going to have to start subsidizing EV production and distribution–and not just small sedans either.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. RE: “We’re not transitioning quickly enough to avert the more catastrophic climate change predictions.”

          Maybe not, but the most catasrophic predictions are probably foolish. In any case, EVs don’t solve pollution problems very well.

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