New Jersey Town Bills Teenage BLM Protest Organizer $2,500 For Police Overtime

Source: ZeroHedge.

You gotta love Jersey girls, I guess.

I suppose this story raises First Amendment issues, but I’m not inclined to take them seriously. At most, the free speech interest conflicts with the town’s equally valid governance interests. When such irresolvable conflicts arise it is reasonable for some form of compromise rule to apply, such as the Town’s expectation to be notified prior to the event.

Assuming there’s an ordinance on the books that requires protest organizers to obtain permits, the First Amendment is irrelevant here.

7 thoughts on “New Jersey Town Bills Teenage BLM Protest Organizer $2,500 For Police Overtime

  1. Ms. Gil seems to have done what needed to be done. Before the event took place she was in contact with the ‘borough officials’ who wanted her to meet with them in person. She refused, because (you know) our country IS in the middle of a worldwide pandemic. She agreed to meet with them via Zoom. The refused and quit responded to her request to talk with them further, but they didn’t bother to menton to her that even a very small protest would have to incur ‘police overtime’ fees – whether they turned out to be needed or not.

    https://www.nj.com/bergen/2020/08/nj-teen-who-held-black-lives-matter-protest-gets-hit-with-2500-bill-for-police-overtime.html

    My first thought was, ‘if the overtime officers couldn’t handle “30-40” teenagers, maybe THEY should be defunded. Ha, and big smile. That’s tongue-in-cheek’ for those of you getting your britches in a wad.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. There was a time not long ago when the outlier stories of local officials doing odd things were relegated to the supermarket tabloids.

    Now with the internet and all its social media, every fart is noted and can go viral if the timing is right.

    I am not belittling this story in particular, but these kinds of stories take on a life of their own. And yet there are thousands of town councils that act appropriately for every one that makes headlines.

    In a way it is like the videos of burning and looting that are run on endless loops because of the relatively small number of violent protests in some larger cities. (Not long ago there were instances of videos and photos that were not from the subject city. Or even an ad with police being attacked in Ukraine as representing US street demonstrations.)

    Why the town leaders refused to have a zoom meeting is curious. But, it could be the teens best defense.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. RE: “Now with the internet and all its social media, every fart is noted and can go viral if the timing is right.”

      For what it’s worth, I shared the story to make a point about the First Amendment, which it ocassions. I am not of the view that the municipal authorities did anything either odd or wrong.

      In the story as written, the First Amendment issue arises by groupthink, not by reason.

      Like

  3. Good for the city and police department. Enough of this lame poor pitiful me crap. The rioting, looting and sheer destruction by imbecile left wing kooks has long since gone too far. Has war been declared yet? If not, it will be very soon. Peaceful protests, my ass. “Small number of violent protests”, my ass. This will not end well.

    Like

  4. Apparently, the mayor is way ahead of the police chief on legal issues. Figures. He rescinded the bill upon hearing of it with apologies.

    Local government, and the average idiots in it, generate far many more Constitutional rights violations than the ACLU can handle.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. What continues to be ignored is the REASON for the protests. Yes, the violence takes away from the message intended. But the continued focus on the violence is as big a problem as the violence itesle.

    More conversation and reform, less violence. And stop the vigilantes who are deciding HOW to enforce laws. They are not helping. They are as much a problem as those who overtake the peaceful protests.

    Liked by 1 person

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