Coke, Nike, and Pro-Black Lives Matter Corps are Using Slave Labor

Source: Frontpage Mag.

Scott Adams often notes that pointing one’s finger at hypocrisy always fails as persuasion. So, go beyond that here. Consider, instead, a different dimension: That Chinese communism is the new model of capitalism to be imported to the West.

In that context, expressions of corporate solidarity with Black Lives Matter, Inc. and related “social justice” fashion trends suddenly make perfect sense. The process is straightforward: First, demoralize the people. Then, when they are miserable and unsure of themselves, build your dream of social order and material abundance.

No one will notice the barbed wire go up. A sufficiently unhappy people never do. More than that, many will tell the ones who notice they are seeing things. Confusion works that way.

The antidote is to learn to recognize Marxism when we see it. China’s political philosophy is Marxist. BLM’s political philosophy is Marxist. They are the same.

26 thoughts on “Coke, Nike, and Pro-Black Lives Matter Corps are Using Slave Labor

  1. “First, demoralize the people. Then, when they are miserable and unsure of themselves, build your dream of social order and material abundance.”

    Sounds more like someone else we all know….

    Like

  2. Your link makes a very out of context phrase by Tim Kaine.

    “The first African Americans sent into the English colonies came to Point Comfort in 1619. They were slaves, they had been captured against their will, but they landed in colonies that didn’t have slavery — there were no laws about slavery in the colonies at that time,” Kaine explained. “The United States didn’t inherit slavery from anybody. We created it. It got created by the Virginia General Assembly and the legislatures of other states. It got created by the court systems in colonial America that enforced fugitive slave laws.”

    Pretty obvious Kaine is talking about the existence of industrial slavery in the US, not inventing slavery for the world.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The link remains solid. Even with the context you provide, Kaine’s statement alleges moral failing on the part of the United States.

      But Kaine’s sentiment ignores history, just as contemporary apologists for China studiously ignore the abundant modern slavery in that country.

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      1. …”Kaine’s sentiment ignores history”…

        In what way does he ignore history? The first slaves were brought to this land in 1619. It WAS created in the General Assemblies of many states, including our own Constitution (3/5’s Compromise ring a bell?). Court systems DID enforce fugitive slave laws.

        Kaine explained the history accurately and truthfully.

        Who are the “contemporary apologists for China”? I am not denying the modern slavery in China. It is one of the many factors that never get addressed by the governments in the name of corporate profits. And when it does get brought up, it is put aside in the name of the almighty dollar (or yuan, if you prefer.)

        Liked by 1 person

        1. RE: “In what way does he ignore history?”

          Two come readily to mind. The first is the fact that the American colonies were extentions of the British empire. Whatever slavery the colonies “created” with their local governments they did so under the crown.

          The second is that our Declaration of Independence established the baseline for the abolition of slavery in the U.S. See Frederick Douglas, Booker T. Washington and Martin Luther King for insight on this historical topic. Kaine’s rationalization leaves them out.

          RE: “Who are the ‘contemporary apologists for China’?”

          The ones mentioned in the linked article are Coke, Nike and “pro-Black Lives Matter” corporations. But Joe Biden would be another example.

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          1. I disagree with your opinion that he “ignored history”. Slavery may have been created under the crown, but the colonists chose to do so. And while the Declaration of Independence is a founding document, it does not establish law. The Constitution did that. And while the basis for abolition is there, it was not followed in 1787. It did not happen until the 13th amendment. And the Jim Crow laws that followed did everything they could to mute the ideals of the 13th.

            “The ones mentioned in the linked article are Coke, Nike and “pro-Black Lives Matter” corporations.”

            As I stated, “It is one of the many factors that never get addressed by the governments in the name of corporate profits. And when it does get brought up, it is put aside in the name of the almighty dollar (or yuan, if you prefer.)”

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      2. “ Kaine’s statement alleges moral failing on the part of the United States…”

        So admitting to moral failings in a history is bad?

        How does a nation, or any person or entity, improve until theY first admit that there was a problem.

        Plenty of Americans opposed forced labor as an economic engine to production. It was certainly considered a moral failing to many, if not most, early Americans. Not that they necessarily considered Africans as equals, but slavery was not acceptable to everyone, that is for sure.

        Are you suggesting that America has no moral failings? And to bring them to light is bad?

        Liked by 1 person

        1. RE: “So admitting to moral failings in a history is bad?”

          It can be: Is the history accurate? Is it biased? Is it demonstrably true?

          RE: “Are you suggesting that America has no moral failings? And to bring them to light is bad?”

          Yes, in a way.

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          1. Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it. Why is it “bad” to bring historical moral failings to light? By understanding them and learning from them, we can get closer to the ideal of a “more perfect union.” To deny their existence is wrong – IMO.

            Sounds to me like YOU are the one trying to rewrite history, which is the accusation being made about those who are trying to bring a better understanding of it to the fore.

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  3. “ Xi explained to Trump why he was basically building concentration camps in Xinjiang,” Bolton wrote, citing the interpreter’s account. The interpreter added that “Trump said that Xi should go ahead with building the camps, which Trump thought was exactly the right thing to do,” according to the book.

    Bolton also wrote in the book that Matthew Pottinger, a retired US Marine and the current deputy national security adviser, “told me that Trump said something very similar during his November 2017 trip to China.”

    https://www.businessinsider.com/trump-china-detention-camp-xinjiang-2020-6

    Well, there you go. The US is now officially approving slave labor under the leadership of the current president.

    So if Trump approves of slavery in China, what is to stop him from establishing camps for disfavored minorities, like Muslims, to help boost our production here.

    Gitmo might be a good place to start. Maybe a Trump line of products to add to his portfolio of wine, vodka, suits, etc.

    Hey, here is an idea. He can use slave labor to replace all the illegal immigrant labor he used for decades at his golf courses and resorts.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. ” BLM’s political philosophy is Marxist.”

    I didn’t see much about Marxism v. Capitalism at the BLM website. Mostly about rights and freedoms of blacks, transgender, etc.

    https://blacklivesmatter.com/what-we-believe/

    There was a reference to a village raising children as contrasted with solely relying on the nuclear family. And that is not bad, particularly in an economy where both parents have to work, at multiple jobs each in some cases. Or with single parent households and the parent has long hours at low paying labor.

    When I grew up, all the parents knew all the kids on the block and immediate surrounding neighborhood. There was little pushback on neighbors disciplining your child, or at least reporting him to his parents. Nothing startling or threatening about that.

    Unless we want to disparage a minority, then it becomes a problem.

    Yes, some of the leaders have spouted collective economic ideas too. But those are on not on the BLM website.

    In contrast, Trump has disparaged media and even sued them for criticizing him and his administration. That doesn’t mean he can act like a dictator even if he says so. It is not in our Constitution to allow such behavior.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Slavery was created in the US? What planet are liberals coming from? Slavery was an active trade long before anyone even decided to colonize America.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_Spain
    Although it was bad, it was a perfectly acceptable worldwide source of labor at the time along with indentured servitude. What I find striking is black people and the left aren’t railing against the Spanish or Portuguese who started the slave trade nor the Africans who actually kidnapped their own to sell for profit. The US’s only moral failing was joining an acceptable source of labor at the time but you cannot judge history through a modern lens.

    This whole current debacle is not about “racial” justice as that has long since been rectified. Claims of “Systemic racism” and widespread oppression are as phony as it gets and is not supported by facts. It is just a farce for socialism perpetrated by the radical left wing including Omar, Obama and Biden.

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    1. “Slavery was created in the US? ”

      No one said that. No one even suggested that. Where in the hell do you get to a thought pattern such as that?

      …” “racial” justice as that has long since been rectified. ”

      Spoken like a person that has never experienced injustice directed at him by systems, neighbors or authorities. You don’t get it, and it appears, you never will.

      The only farce I am seeing is where your brain lives.

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        1. “Claims of widespread oppression and police bias is phony.”

          I make nothing up. I’ve seen it. I’ve experienced it. I’ve had close personal friends experience it as well. Systemic does not equal universal. But bias IS embedded in our systems.

          So says you and the WSJ. Until you have been oppressed, you won’t believe it exists. I get that. But you fail to understand those that have been mistreated by systems based striclty on who they are.

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          1. Your claims are nonsense. If anything, you were taught to believe that and can’t see the truth of your own failings. It doesn’t exist except in race cards and the liberal playbook.

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          2. …”you were taught to believe that”…

            You know nothing of what I was taught, but I will explain to you. Treat others fairly, walk in the other one’s shoes before you judge. And don’t get caught up in the netherworld of denial.

            “It doesn’t exist except in race cards and the liberal playbook.”

            You are clueless to the realities of life of others. You live in your protected bubble and see nothing of others suffering. I wish you well.

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      1. BTW, you are the one who said slavery was created in the US. Specifically in the general assemblies and congress.

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    1. “…when you allow extremist socialists into government.”

      We don’t “allow” anyone. They get elected by their constituents. This way if they don’t live up to their promises or ignore their districts, they get fired either 2, 4 or 6 years later depending upon if they are Representatives, Presidents or Senators.

      In a nation as big, diverse and spread out as we are, the Congress will look somewhat like the landscape.

      And that is the beauty of our wonderful United States.

      IMHO

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Allowed or elected, same thing. Like I said, ask those that lived through it how that turned out. Once allowed because of empty promises, it is very hard to get back to normal. Especially after the regime confiscates all means of self protection which is at the top of the left wing agenda. The rest of us aren’t stupid.

        California and New York are not “the landscape” but liberals think they are.

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        1. “California and New York are not “the landscape””

          Not the entirety, but a part of it. Just like Michigan, Iowa, Arizona NC, even VA. In the same vein, Texas, Oklahoma, Alabama, and Mississippi are not the landscape self-proclaimed Conservatives (now mostly Trump loyalists) think it is. The “landscape” is truly made up of the people. In this country, that is a diverse group of individuals with differing views on all aspects of life. Your next door neighbor may or may not agree with your thinking on numerous topics. He may also be a transgendered male who has been discriminated against his entire life. But he is still part of the landscape.

          Beating the “fear socialism” drum is as empty as most of the promises trump has made.

          Liked by 1 person

  6. Yeah, so? MinuteMaid, oranges, Central America. We know this. It’s begin going on for nearly a century. If Coke supports BLM it is because it fits their profit motive. So?

    Liked by 1 person

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