Biden and Dems Are Set to Abolish the Suburbs

Source: National Review Online.

I have commented on President Obama’s Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) act many times, often in the context of denouncing The Virginian Pilot’s support for regionalism in Hampton Roads. Cooperation among local governments is probably a good thing in many ways, but it can also become subversive, especially under the transactional influence of a central government that hand out monies.

Kurtz focuses in this piece mainly on the tax-and-spending consequences of AFFH, and its role in current political dramas, but to grasp the full implications of AFFH, it pays to follow the links to Kurtz’s early work on the act. Imagine being told you can’t live in an apartment you can afford, which is convenient to your job, and which you happen to like, because you have the wrong skin color. That’s one of the devils that live in the details of the AFFH act.

10 thoughts on “Biden and Dems Are Set to Abolish the Suburbs

  1. “Cooperation among local governments is probably a good thing in many ways, but it can also become subversive”…

    As uncooperative as you appear to be on most things, I am not surprised that you feel the way you do about regionalism. Even the Navy has gone to regions with great success.

    And like our moderator, if it from Obama, it be bad. Example form your lede” …”mainly on the tax-and-spending consequences”… When it is a Democraat doing it, it is bad policy. When it is a Republican, it is damned good policy. H-Y-P-…you know the rest.

    “Imagine being told you can’t live in an apartment you can afford, which is convenient to your job, and which you happen to like, because you have the wrong skin color.”

    Been happening to Black Americans for centuries. It happened to this American Jewish family, based on religion, when I was growing up.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m really not in favor of zoning at all, favoring restrictive covenants for property use control.

      But if zoning is to be done at all, it should be solely for protection of property value, and not for social engineering at any level of government.

      Like

      1. Let me know the last time YOU were denied housing for ANY reason outside of affordability.

        It is not about social engineering, it is about people being able to live where they want. Just like you.

        Like

        1. If urbanization of the suburbs and countryside are mandated by the government, the place I want to live will no longer exist.

          I once lived in a trailer park. I worked and saved and moved to a 1000 sq ft house packed in next to similar houses on a 4000 sq ft lot, and then to a larger house on a 12,000 sq ft lot, and now I live on 6 acres in the country with a pond and a rifle range.

          Not everyone can live here, and putting high density housing out here would destroy what I worked for.

          But it is true that affordability was the reason that I didn’t start out where I am. It’s why people work and save.

          So, tell me why someone who has not worked and saved should be able to live here just because they want to, when that would totally change the nature of “here”

          Like

  2. “ Imagine being told you can’t live in an apartment you can afford, which is convenient to your job, and which you happen to like, because you have the wrong skin color. That’s one of the devils that live in the details of the AFFH act.”

    I didn’t see that in the article. But, as Adam wrote, this is the norm for minorities, even today. Today is just more subtle using such methods as differing mortgage rates for equally qualified blacks and whites.

    Kurtz talks about creating urban zones within the suburbs. We already do that and have been for decades. Town Center, for example.

    Modern living for the current younger generation is not about 1/4 acre of lawn, a house, shed, and garage. Thousands of folks have moved back into Norfolk.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. RE: “I didn’t see that in the article.”

      It isn’t. It is one of the things you can learn from reading Kurtz’s earlier work on this topic, which I referenced in the previous sentence.

      Do you believe that federally enforced racial preferences in the allocation of housing are a desirable public policy?

      Like

      1. “Do you believe that federally enforced racial preferences in the allocation of housing are a desirable public policy?“

        A loaded question. It was the policy for centuries to allocate housing by skin color. So we are quite adept at it.

        It is a version of affirmative action but may be unnecessary so long as there is no racial preference in either housing or mortgages.

        But I did not read Kurtz’s other treatise.

        Ever wonder what our nation would be like if the freed slaves were allowed to keep their 40 acres, were welcomed into homes, schools and churches, were allowed to intermarry, vote freely, and become part of our nation instead of what really happened.

        Now that would have been American Exceptionalism on a grand scale.

        But that never happened. And we still have black ghettoes, segregated schools, wealth gaps, wage gaps.

        Many conservatives
        say that is all self-
        inflicted.
        Maybe there was some help.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. How is it that a system which does everything in its power to keep certain people in their place leads to “self-inflicted” situations? Maybe the next time a conservative makes that statement, we should ask what they have done to ensure freedom for all? “I have a gun and my wife as no idea how to use it. But I’ll let her wave it around the front yard as people walk on by.”

          Liked by 1 person

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