Sad News

https://thehill.com/policy/defense/492472-roosevelt-sailor-with-coronavirus-dies

For those of you who say the coronavirus doesn’t effect younger people. And any underlying conditions this sailor may have had were more than likely identified and being treated.

To the Governor of Florida, who wants to open his schools (we all do want our schools open, buy the way. Just safely) because younger people aren’t affected as badly as others, may want to rethink that. Any parent knows that schools a day cares are incubators for infectious illnesses. Regardless of “herd immunity”. Plus, the health of teachers and other staff need to be considered before jumping the gun. Until there is a vaccine, we need be prudent on what opens when.

14 thoughts on “Sad News

  1. There is never going to be a definable moment when it is “safe” to send the children back to school. Instead, we’re going to have to choose among the various risks that we face in doing so.

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    1. I’d rather be safe than sorry. My daughter, as said several times, is a school teacher. She would much rather be in the classroom than working on online curriculum for students. She is also the mother of 2. I do not like the idea of her possibly bringing home a virus from an asymptomatic student and sharing it with her family.

      When YOU or YOUR family are the one’s facing the risks, then maybe you’ll see things differently.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Since I, myself, belong to multiple high risk groups, I can be self-centered with the best of them. But that won’t change the facts at hand.

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  2. Since I, myself, belong to multiple high risk groups, I can be self-centered with the best of them. But that won’t change the facts at hand.

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    1. But you can self-quarantine. YOU can decide when and where you can go. When it is your job to be potentially exposed to this, then, again, you might see things in a different light. But then again. I doubt it.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. To quote a not-so wise man, “So what?”

          Your assery is also bigger than my assery. Also, your facts tend to be less factual than my facts. Again, to quote, “So What?”

          I may not be over 60 (yet), but being a cancer survivor, I too, am in a high risk group. That doesn’t mean I would be happy for my daughter to be prematurely forced into a situation where the health of her and her family would be jeopardized.

          Liked by 2 people

          1. RE: “So what?”

            That depends on you. I’m just test driving your own argument to see if it works on you.

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          2. You do know that when you crash during a test drive, you are responsible for the damage. Hope your premiums are paid up. Oh, Wait! You don’t believe in insurance.

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  3. It has been said that the only way to end a pandemic is by herd immunity.

    Probably true.

    In the past, plagues ended after a significant percentage of the population died and the survivors had immunity. With some diseases and in some populations, the results were catastrophic as with smallpox and indigenous peoples during the exploration age.

    Today we achieve herd immunity via vaccination programs.

    We don’t know what the casualty rate would be for gaining herd immunity in a population of 330 million. Partly, because we have not gathered, and still can’t gather, infection versus survival data. And this disease is apparently contagious for up to 10 days before symptoms show, another difference with past viral pandemics.

    We would achieve 80% immunity if 264 million of us became infected. and survived.

    The problem is survival.Even if, and this is a big if, the mortality rate were just .2%, or even .1%, similar to the flu according to many, that would still be an extraordinary level of fatalities: 264,000 – 528,000 nationwide.

    We’ve had seasonal flu forever, and yes it kills people, 15-60K depending on a lot of variables. But I believe many are immune already and we have a flu vaccine that is fairly effective most years if not for preventing the disease, but at least attenuating it.

    IMHO

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Your numbers are off. A flu-comparable infection mortality rate based on 15-60,000 deaths would be 0.000045 to o.00018.

      If covid-19’s actual mortality rate fits within that range, sending the children back to school might be a rational choice.

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  4. Your numbers are off. A flu-comparable infection mortality rate based on 15-60,000 deaths would be 0.000045 to o.00018.

    If covid-19’s actual mortality rate fits within that range, sending the children back to school might be a rational choice.

    Like

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