Interesting gun control measure

https://digitaledition.pilotonline.com/html5/mobile/production/default.aspx?pubid=248c93c1-2d54-411c-a446-54c2127375d1

I don’t know if this link works, but it is a WAPO article about tracking credit card purchases of guns and ammo to flag potential mass shooters.

Big data already knows everything about everybody and this would be at least a potentially useful application.

16 thoughts on “Interesting gun control measure

  1. RE: “Big data already knows everything about everybody and this would be at least a potentially useful application.”

    Right. Let’s pretend evil is good.

    BTW, the link doesn’t work for me.

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    1. The link is from the new digital version of the Pilot. It is much improved, but quite different. And a lot more current than Pilotonline which often has news days old.

      Try ePilot. Of course this assumes you subscribe to the a Pilot. I tested the link again and just got to the ePilot, but not the article. So I apologize, but the article is easy to find. Just “read” the paper since it is an exact copy of the print edition, ads and all. Swiping the pages turns them to the next one.

      As far as credit card companies already selling your personal activity data, I agree. But we are not Europe where such stuff is opt in only. So if someone buys several guns, a lot of ammo, night vision goggles, tactical gear it might be a red flag.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. RE: “So if someone buys several guns, a lot of ammo, night vision goggles, tactical gear it might be a red flag.”

      An evil red flag remains evil.

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        1. If you mean to imply that the choice is between slaughter and surveillance, I’ll take the slaughter.

          I don’t think that’s the choice, but as long as we’re posing crazy hypotheticals I prefer an occassional mass shooter over a permanent, 24×7 surveillance state.

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          1. We already have a 24/7 surveillance state. At least in the private sector. If Visa can sell data that I like pecans so much that I get banner ads all the time or mailers from nut companies, why not pass on that you bought 5 pistols, night vision goggles and 1000 rounds yesterday.

            In a sense, we are both “nutcases”. But one is not healthy for living things.

            Liked by 1 person

          2. If you believe the 24/7 surveillance state is limited to the private sector, I think you’re mistaken. Not that I approved of the way Snowden reacted, or the way the government reacted to Snowden, but he did let us know what was going on.

            As far as the proposed measure goes, I wonder how 4th Amendment folks would feel about it. It could be a good thing, but the implementation would be an issue.

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          3. RE: “If Visa can sell data that I like pecans so much that I get banner ads all the time or mailers from nut companies, why not pass on that you bought 5 pistols, night vision goggles and 1000 rounds yesterday.”

            Maybe you’ll see the difference when the police show up to make you buy walnuts, instead.

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        1. Online, hotels, rent-a-cars, and airline tickets. Other than those (and once this year at CostCo — just couldn’t control myself) I haven’t used a credit card in years.

          BUT, don’t think you cannot still be tracked with cash. If an ATM can read a deposited check, it can read the serial numbers of the bills that it dispenses to you, and when that 7-11 makes its deposits, the serial numbers can be read again. It won’t be perfect, doesn’t have to be, but they can track first order movement of even cash.

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  2. I see that the pileup and the daily mess have identical sites save for the banner. BTW, the daily mess format was the one chosen.

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  3. Not liking this.

    When I go to The Armory in VB (or any store for that matter) and buy things…they send a data stream to the card’s vendor.

    That data stream consists of what is to be transferred between our respective financial accounts.

    It does not (and should not) contain the UPC’s of purchased items.

    Should that become common place? It’ll be further developed and eventually abused in other facets of our daily lives.

    $20 says insurance providers will be the first to obtain that data.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. So someone buys a lot of candy and junk food. Is that a red flag that Humana should know about? The possibilities are endless but to be honest I doubt anyone intent on committing violence would do so on a credit card all at once and criminals don’t buy legally anyway.

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